Genome-editing techniques are promising tools in plant breeding. To facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the current and future applications of genome editing in crops, EU-SAGE developed an interactive, publicly accessible online database of genome-edited crops.

The aim of the database is to inform interested stakeholder communities in a transparent manner about the latest evidence about genome editing applications in crops. Different elements including the plant species, traits, techniques, and applications can be filtered in this database.

Regarding the methodology, a literature search in the bibliographic databases and web pages of governmental agencies was conducted using predefined queries in English. Identifying research articles in other languages was not possible due to language barriers. Patents were not screened.

Peer-reviewed articles were screened for relevance and were included in the database based on pre-defined criteria. The main criterium is that the research article should describe a research study of any crop developed for market-oriented agricultural production as a result of a genome editing.

This database will be regularly updated. Please contact us via the following webpage (https://www.eu-sage.eu/contact) in case you would like to inform us about a new scientific study of crops developed for market-oriented agricultural production as a result of genome editing.

This work has been supported by Task Force Planet Re-Imagine Europa (https://reimagine-europa.eu/area/planet)

Displaying 29 results

Traits related to product color/flavour

Purple color.
( Xu et al., 2019 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Nanjing Agricultural University, China
Crop modification: albino phenotype.
(Wang et al., 2017)
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Huazhong Agricultural University, China
University of Pennsylvania, USA
Flower color modification to a pale purplish pink flower color compared to the purple violet wild type.
( Yu et al., 2021 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Hanyang University
Chungnam National University, South Korea
Fruit coloration. Fruit color affects consumer preference and is one of the breeding objectives of great interests. For example, white-fruited cultivars are sold at a much higher price than red-fruited cultivars.
( Gao et al., 2020 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Huazhong Agricultural University, China
University of Maryland, USA
Yellow and orange fruit color.
( Dahan-Meir et al., 2018 )
SDN2
CRISPR/Cas
Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel
Pink fruit color.
( Deng et al., 2018 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences
Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
Color modification: pink tomatoes.
(Yang et al., 2019)
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Huazhong Agricultural University
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, China
Colour modification. Purple tomatoes.
( Cermak et al., 2015 )
SDN2
TALENs
University of Minnesota, USA
Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic
Color modification due to reduced anthocyanin accumulation.
( Klimek-Chodacka et al., 2018 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
East Carolina University
University of Maryland, USA
Flower color modification due to reduced anthocyanin content. Flower color is one of the most important traits in ornamental flowers.
( Nishihara et al. (2018) )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Iwate Biotechnology Research Center, Japan
Albino phenotype.
( Charrier et al., 2019 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Université d'
Angers, France
Colour shift. The poinsettia belongs to most economically important potted ornamental plants. Customers are willing to pay higher prices for unusual varieties.
( Nitarska et al., 2021 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Technische Universität Wien, Austria
Klemm+Sohn GmbH &
Co
Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany
Albinism and dwarfing.
( Naim et al., 2018 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Albino phenotype.
( Wilson et al., 2019 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
NIAB EMR, UK
Albino phenotype.
( Syombua et al., 2021 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)
University of Nairobi, Kenya
University of Missouri
Iowa State University
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, USA
Fruit color: tangerine
(Ben Shlush et al., 2021)
SDN2
CRISPR/Cas
The Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel
Color modification: yellow. Ipomoea nil exhibits a variety of flower colours, except yellow.
(Watanabe et al., 2018)
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
University of Tsukuba
National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Japan
Albino phenotype.
( Kaur et al., 2017 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
National Agri-Food Biotechnology Institute (NABI), India
Albino phenotype
( Bánfalvi et al., 2020 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
NARIC Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, Hungary
Colour modification. Purple tomatoes.
( Cermak et al., 2015 )
SDN2
CRISPR/Cas
University of Minnesota, USA
Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic
Red rice. The pigments of coloured rice contain high levels of proanthocyanidins and anthocyanins which have been recognized as health-promoting nutrients.
( Zhu et al., 2019 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Xiamen University
Fujian Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Minjiang University, China
Albino phenotype. Diversity in fruit color. Watermelon is an important fruit croup throughout the world.
( Tian et al., 2016 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Beijing Key Laboratory of Vegetable Germplasm Improvement
China Agricultural University
Beijing University of Agriculture, China
Albino phenotype.
( Wilson et al., 2019 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
NIAB EMR, UK
Albino phenotype and early flowering.
( Charrier et al., 2019 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Université d'
Angers, France
Albino phenotype.
( Wang et al., 2018 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Botany
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Botany
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
Altered color of petals and leaves.
( Li et al., 2022 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Huazhong Agricultural University
Hubei Hongshan Laboratory, China
Fine-tuned anthocyanin biosynthesis.
( )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Northeast Forestry University, Horticultural Sub-academy of Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China
Wonsan University of Agriculture, South Korea
Albino phenotype.
( De Bruyn et al., 2020 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
Flanders Research Institute for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (ILVO)
Ghent University
Center for Plant Systems Biology Belgium
Albino phenotype.
( Brewer et al., 2022 )
SDN1
CRISPR/Cas
University of Florida, USA